What is an Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

This outpatient procedure numbs the arm and hand with an injection of local anesthetic. Typically, it is used before or after surgery on the elbow, forearm or hand. The numbing sensation will last for several hours after the injection. The arm will be placed in a sling until the nerve block wears off. When the anesthesia wears off, painkillers may be needed to alleviate pain from the procedure.

What is Cervical Selective Nerve Root Block (CSNRB)?

This injection relieves pain in the neck, shoulders, and arms caused by a pinched nerve (or nerves) in the cervical spine. It can be used to treat conditions such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and radiculopathy.

The procedure is performed with the patient lying face down or face up to expose the neck. The patient may be sedated but awake during the procedure. A region of skin and tissue of the neck is numbed with a local anesthetic delivered through a small needle.

Facet Joint Injections

The facet joints, found on both sides of the back of the spine, can become painfully irritated or inflamed. A facet joint injection may help diagnose the source of a patient’s pain. It can also relieve pain and inflammation.

In preparation for the procedure, the provider numbs the skin and tissue above the facet joint with an injection of local anesthetic.

Congratulations to Dr. Eric G. Cornidez!

Celebrating the 2017 winners at the 40 Under 40 Awards Breakfast, December 5, 2017

 

Congratulations to Dr. Eric G. Cornidez for receiving the award for 40 under 40 from the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Arizona Daily Star. The award recognizes young leaders who are making an impact in the community with their professional and charitable work.

 

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Kyphoplasty (Balloon Vertebroplasty)

This minimally-invasive procedure repairs a vertebral compression fracture. It helps restore the spine’s natural shape. Some patients experience rapid pain relief after the procedure.

Before the procedure, you are anesthetized. The physician guides a needle through the skin of your back and into your fractured vertebra. A special x-ray device called a “fluoroscope” helps the physician position the needle.